SPECIES

Lake Como and the Valtellina and Chiavenna valleys are home to a fantastic variety of fish from stunning Brown, Rainbow and Marble Trout, to huge Pike, Zander and Perch, and all fall under the protection of FIPSAS – The Italian Federation of Sport Fishing, who have contributed to creating and replenishing amazing fishing environments throughout the region.

Here is a description of the main species targeted for fishing locally:

The Perch is a carnivorous fish most commonly found throughout the world in small ponds, lakes, streams and rivers. The Perch mainly feeds on smaller fish, shellfish, or insect larvae, and is known to be extremely aggressive and often found hunting in packs.

With record catches going up to 60cms in length, the Perch is renowned throughout the world for being a great fish to catch with an impressive fight, and can be caught with nearly any bait. The Perch can live up to 22 years, and has been fished for food throughout the world for centuries.

While there are three main species of Perch, only one is to be found in Italy – the European Perch, this is however the largest of all the Perch genera. The presence of the Perch in Italy has been documented for centuries, however it is widely believed that it was not truly indigenous, and has been classed as somewhat of a delicacy since its first documentation.

The perch is one of the most common and most popular species for anglers in the province, present in all of north Italy’s lakes and actively sought after by sports fishermen and professionals alike. The Perch has always been a typical food of the people of the lake and a delicious dish of many local restaurants.

While in Lake Como and Lake Lugano, the perch is thriving and in good health, in smaller lakes its populations in recent decades has, for various reasons, been significantly reduced. The increase of populations in both lakes is a main objective of the province, which each year makes environmental improvement measures in order to favour the natural reproduction of perch, and maintain numbers for future generations of this local lake delicacy.

Whieldon Fly Fishing - Classic TroutFound throughout the world, and fast becoming the most popular target species of many anglers, the Trout is renowned for its fantastic fight when hooked and its stunning array of colours and patterns throughout the different sub-species.

Fly fishing was developed as the most successful technique for trout fishing, and while fly-fishing is the primary tactic employed worldwide, a number of different techniques are also used, from spinning to float fishing, and the local technique of Molagna – a type of trawl fishing.

In northern Italy there are four main sub-species of trout to be found – the Brown, Rainbow, Marble and Lake Trout, with several local hybrid species emerging in recent years. They can be found throughout the local lakes, rivers and streams and have been fished for sport and more importantly for food purposes for centuries.

It is believed that the brown trout was originally indigenous to only the Alps and the northern slopes of the Apennines, but was introduced to the rest of the country centuries ago. The species is in turn divided into two strains, of which only the “Mediterranean Brown” can be classed as native to Italy, while the “Atlantic Brown” is classed as an introduced species.

With all of the local lakes, rivers and streams now falling under the protection of the FIPSAS – The Italian Federation of Sport Fishing, who have introduced many conservation efforts and programs throughout the region, the Trout is now a thriving species that can be fished for sport and for food for generations to come.

The Shad or ‘Freshwater Tarpon’ as it is known, is one of the most popular fish to target throughout northern Italy. When hooked, the Shad performs stunning jumps and cartwheels and has taken many an angler to their backing line!

A sub-species of the herring family that can be found throughout the lakes and rivers of the Como region, locally called sardina due to its similarity to the sardine fish, they are a local delicacy that can be enjoyed in many restaurants and tavernas.

It is believed that the shad found in lake Como became land locked and divided from their Mediterranean cousins during migration, while searching for spawning locations and heading up the rivers they then settled in the lake.

The shad can be found in large populations in both Lake Como and Lake Lugano, and is of great importance for locals and has been fished for food for generations.

Celebrated as a delicacy, the local people of northern Italy have long practiced an unusual preparation technique – each evening the fishermen head out at sunset to set their nets, and return at dawn to retrieve them. The fresh fish are then salted for 48 hours before being left to dry for around a month somewhere cool and well ventilated. Following this, they are arranged in special containers where they are pressed to drain off the fat and then covered in olive oil. They are then left for at least four months and are then eaten lightly grilled and generally served with the local polenta. Once dried and pressed, the shad become the famous “missoltino”, which was once essential food in the diet of the people of the lake and is now appreciated on the tables of local restaurants and tavernas.

Possibly the most fearsome freshwater fish to be found throughout Europe, the Pike is known for its awesome fighting action and also as a source of food throughout much of the world.

While the northern Pike can be found throughout the world and is known to grow to sizes exceeding 55cms, here in Italy we also have something that no one else has – Esox cisalpinus, or the ‘Southern Pike’. This newly discovered sub-species was discovered in 2011, and is an important species for recreational and commercial fisheries, and for its role as the top predator in the freshwater ecosystems that it inhabits.

While generally considered indigenous, its native range is controversial. It is believed to be a native species for the Po, Venetian district, while its presence in the Tuscany, Lazio region is due to human intervention.

Whieldon Fly Fishing - fishing for pike lake ComoThe pike is present throughout all the lake waters within the local provinces, and in lake Como and lake Lugano the populations of pike have significantly increased in recent years. This is due to local conservation efforts, and namely the introduction and development of submerged aquatic plant life in large areas of the coastal regions.

The Pike, while being highly prized and protected for sport fishing purposes, is also of major importance for the local wildlife, and its conservation is pursued through periodic re-population. In the local lakes the species enjoys special protection: from 2007 pike fishing in several of the smaller lake basins is “catch and release” only.

The Chub is a member of the Carp family or the Cyprinidae found throughout lakes and rivers across the world. Known to reach lengths of up to 80cms, and weighing up to 9lb, they are a highly sought after fish by many sports fishermen.

Chub are renowned for being very greedy fish, and can be caught on a wide range of baits and techniques. Often mistaken for grass Carp, they are very similar in appearance, however are distinguishable by the orange-red colouring of their fins.

Mainly found along the margins and small bays, they tend to favour overhanging trees and covered areas. Rarely found on their own, Chub are generally sighted in small shoals especially during their juvenile years.

With their greedy and predatory nature, they can be caught using a wide range of techniques, from small spinners as well as free lining natural baits such as Slugs or Crayfish. Float fishing can also work very well in the summer months, along with fly fishing using large dry flies such as Woolly Buggers, Daddy Longlegs or Hoppers. Some of the most popular baits include maggots, corn, bread, along with boilies, lobworms and slugs, or even floating crust.

The chub is present throughout lake Como, lake Lugano, lake Pusiano, and the whole of north Italy. During the breeding season chub can often be found heading up river tributaries in search of waters suitable for spawning. In lake Como and lake Lugano, although still quite widespread, Chub are no longer as abundant as they once were. For this reason regulations have recently been introduced raising the minimum size of catches that can be kept, along with introducing a closed season for fishing, that coincides with the spawning season.

The Zander is closely related to the Perch, however with a stronger resemblance to the Pike with their long elongated body and head, yet with a spiny dorsal fin similiar to the Perch, they are often called Pike-Perch. Zander are not however, as is commonly believed, a pike and perch hybrid.

Zander are an extremely aggressive fish, and like the Pike can grow extremely large, reaching lengths of up to 120cms and weights of 20kgs, they are a choice target for many anglers, with the world record having been achieved in a local lake – Lago di Maggiore as recently as June 2016.

Known to be extremely aggressive, even with documented cases of attacking humans –  In July 2009 in Switzerland, a zander attacked tourists in Lake Maggiore, sending two people to the emergency room; the worst cut inflicted was about 10 centimeters long. However, the 70-cm 8-kg fish was later caught by the local police who cooked it and offered it to the tourists for the trouble it caused.

With a healthy and widespread population in Lake Lugano for many years, the Zander was since introduced into the local waters of Como. Here they have managed to develop very large populations, and more recently have appeared in the lakes of Pusiano and Lake Piano, where there are significant populations numerically and where we have begun to see individuals of considerable size. In Lake Como itself however, Zander have so far settled effectively in two main areas, the area in front of the city of Como and the extreme northern portion of the basin, near the mouths of the rivers Adda and Mera.

The Zander is a species that is of considerable interest for both sports fishermen and professionals alike, and is protected locally by a prohibition period and also a minimum size for kept fish, in Lake Lugano, Lake Pusiano, Lake Alserio and the first basin of Lake Como.

The freshwater whitefish are fish of one of three subfamilies in the salmon family – Salmonidae, with ‘cousins’ such as the Salmon, the Trout, Char and the Grayling. Freshwater whitefish are distributed mainly in relatively cool waters throughout the northern parts of the Northern Hemisphere.

The European Whitefish is one of many possible species or classifications of Whitefish, and is still under study to determine parameters between identifying species. Originally the Whitefish was not a native species of northern Italy, however it was introduced for the first time in Italy and the Lake Como region in particular in 1885, from specimens that were captured from Lake Constance in Switzerland.

The Whitefish seldom grow more than 55 cm (22 in) long or exceed 2 kg (4.4 lb) in weight, however they are still a popular fish for both sports fishermen and professionals alike.

In the local waters of Como and the surrounding regions, the Whitefish is only present in the lakes of Como and Lugano, while it is absent in the other smaller lakes. In Lake Lugano the species has undergone a drastic decline in numbers due to the eutrophication phenomena (excessive richness of nutrients in a lake or other body of water, frequently due to run-off from the land, which causes a dense growth of plant life), that have affected the waters of the lake in the past several decades. However, the recent hydro-qualitative improvements of the Lugano lake seems to offer again the conditions for the presence of the species, as shown by the first significant catches made by professional fishermen in recent years.

In Lake Como whitefish were introduced at the end of the 19th century in order to increase the rewards for professional fishing. The whitefish is of such high importance to the local fishing industry, that it is the main reason behind the restructuring and building work under taken on the river Fiumelatte and its incubation systems, which since 2001, have been reactivated with the aim of producing hundreds of thousands of young Whitefish for Lake Como and the fishing industry that surrounds it.

The Burbot is a freshwater fish in the gadidae family, with cousins such as the cod, it is believed to be the only freshwater member of the family. Known to favour deep waters and specifically lakes, they are often to be found at depths of around 300m (980ft).

Believed to be extinct throughout much of Europe, however the Burbot can still be found in several of the deepest pre-alpine lakes, and has also been reported in some of their tributaries.

With numbers in serious decline throughout much of the EU, studies are still being undertaken as to the possibility of varying species within the Burbot family, but known maximum lengths range between 30 and 120 cm (12 and 47 in), and weight ranges from 1 to 12 kg (2.2 to 26.5 lb).

As the Burbot is such a unique species of deep water fish, preferring deep lake environments, it is believed that they therefore can only be found in Lake Como and Lake Lugano. With an appearance like a cross between a catfish and an eel, the Burbot has a serpent-like body, but is easily distinguished by a single barbel on the chin. The body is elongated and laterally compressed, with a flattened head and single tube-like projection for each nostril. The mouth is wide, with both upper and lower jaws consisting of many small teeth. Burbot have two soft dorsal fins; the first being low and short, and the second being much longer. The anal fin is low and almost as long as the dorsal fin. Having such small fins relative to body size indicates a benthic or bottom dwelling lifestyle with low swimming endurance, unable to withstand strong currents.

The European Eel is a species of the eel family found throughout Europe, with a snake-like appearance and are mainly catadromous fish, heading downstream to the sea in order to spawn.

With average lengths of around 60 to 80cms, but they have been known to grow up to 1.5 metres in length in extreme cases. Captive specimens of the European Eel have lived as long as 80 years, while the species lifespan in the wild is yet to be determined.

The European Eel can be found in almost all of the lakes and rivers throughout northern Italy from Lake Lugano to Lake Como, and all of the smaller lakes. It is known to be widespread in the river Lambro, in the Mera river and in the channels of the river Adda. Its presence in the Como province depends on the re-population carried out annually, performed to ensure the conservation of the species in an area historically colonised and which would otherwise be difficult for the Eel to reach by natural means.

The black bass is a type of freshwater fish closely related to the sunfish, and originally found throughout North America and Canada. Several species of the bass family were then introduced throughout the world, notably the large-mouth bass and the small-mouth bass.

Of all the members of the bass family, the black bass are possibly the most highly sought-after of all as a game fish, and bass fishing is a very popular sport worldwide. These fish are well known as extremely strong fighters, with many countries also considering them a delicacy.

The male of most species of the bass family builds a nest by hollowing out a depression using his tail, then proceeds to guard the eggs. With its introduction throughout Europe in 1883, its presence in Italy dates back to early in the 20th century, when it was introduced in two lakes – lake Brianza and lake Sommani. Bass now populate almost all lakes, ponds and rivers throughout northern and central Italy.

In Lake Como, the bass as a species appeared only recently and catches until recent years were quite rare. Although it is an exotic species, the large-mouth bass is protected with minimum sizes of fish that can be kept, and a prohibition period each year, and in some lakes (Pusiano, Segrino and Montorfano) with extremely strict catch limits also in place. The species is now of great importance and interest for sport fishing, with catch and release being the general trend.

+ Perch

The Perch is a carnivorous fish most commonly found throughout the world in small ponds, lakes, streams and rivers. The Perch mainly feeds on smaller fish, shellfish, or insect larvae, and is known to be extremely aggressive and often found hunting in packs.

With record catches going up to 60cms in length, the Perch is renowned throughout the world for being a great fish to catch with an impressive fight, and can be caught with nearly any bait. The Perch can live up to 22 years, and has been fished for food throughout the world for centuries.

While there are three main species of Perch, only one is to be found in Italy – the European Perch, this is however the largest of all the Perch genera. The presence of the Perch in Italy has been documented for centuries, however it is widely believed that it was not truly indigenous, and has been classed as somewhat of a delicacy since its first documentation.

The perch is one of the most common and most popular species for anglers in the province, present in all of north Italy’s lakes and actively sought after by sports fishermen and professionals alike. The Perch has always been a typical food of the people of the lake and a delicious dish of many local restaurants.

While in Lake Como and Lake Lugano, the perch is thriving and in good health, in smaller lakes its populations in recent decades has, for various reasons, been significantly reduced. The increase of populations in both lakes is a main objective of the province, which each year makes environmental improvement measures in order to favour the natural reproduction of perch, and maintain numbers for future generations of this local lake delicacy.

+ Brown, Rainbow & Lake Trout

Whieldon Fly Fishing - Classic TroutFound throughout the world, and fast becoming the most popular target species of many anglers, the Trout is renowned for its fantastic fight when hooked and its stunning array of colours and patterns throughout the different sub-species.

Fly fishing was developed as the most successful technique for trout fishing, and while fly-fishing is the primary tactic employed worldwide, a number of different techniques are also used, from spinning to float fishing, and the local technique of Molagna – a type of trawl fishing.

In northern Italy there are four main sub-species of trout to be found – the Brown, Rainbow, Marble and Lake Trout, with several local hybrid species emerging in recent years. They can be found throughout the local lakes, rivers and streams and have been fished for sport and more importantly for food purposes for centuries.

It is believed that the brown trout was originally indigenous to only the Alps and the northern slopes of the Apennines, but was introduced to the rest of the country centuries ago. The species is in turn divided into two strains, of which only the “Mediterranean Brown” can be classed as native to Italy, while the “Atlantic Brown” is classed as an introduced species.

With all of the local lakes, rivers and streams now falling under the protection of the FIPSAS – The Italian Federation of Sport Fishing, who have introduced many conservation efforts and programs throughout the region, the Trout is now a thriving species that can be fished for sport and for food for generations to come.

+ Shad

The Shad or ‘Freshwater Tarpon’ as it is known, is one of the most popular fish to target throughout northern Italy. When hooked, the Shad performs stunning jumps and cartwheels and has taken many an angler to their backing line!

A sub-species of the herring family that can be found throughout the lakes and rivers of the Como region, locally called sardina due to its similarity to the sardine fish, they are a local delicacy that can be enjoyed in many restaurants and tavernas.

It is believed that the shad found in lake Como became land locked and divided from their Mediterranean cousins during migration, while searching for spawning locations and heading up the rivers they then settled in the lake.

The shad can be found in large populations in both Lake Como and Lake Lugano, and is of great importance for locals and has been fished for food for generations.

Celebrated as a delicacy, the local people of northern Italy have long practiced an unusual preparation technique – each evening the fishermen head out at sunset to set their nets, and return at dawn to retrieve them. The fresh fish are then salted for 48 hours before being left to dry for around a month somewhere cool and well ventilated. Following this, they are arranged in special containers where they are pressed to drain off the fat and then covered in olive oil. They are then left for at least four months and are then eaten lightly grilled and generally served with the local polenta. Once dried and pressed, the shad become the famous “missoltino”, which was once essential food in the diet of the people of the lake and is now appreciated on the tables of local restaurants and tavernas.

+ Pike

Possibly the most fearsome freshwater fish to be found throughout Europe, the Pike is known for its awesome fighting action and also as a source of food throughout much of the world.

While the northern Pike can be found throughout the world and is known to grow to sizes exceeding 55cms, here in Italy we also have something that no one else has – Esox cisalpinus, or the ‘Southern Pike’. This newly discovered sub-species was discovered in 2011, and is an important species for recreational and commercial fisheries, and for its role as the top predator in the freshwater ecosystems that it inhabits.

While generally considered indigenous, its native range is controversial. It is believed to be a native species for the Po, Venetian district, while its presence in the Tuscany, Lazio region is due to human intervention.

Whieldon Fly Fishing - fishing for pike lake ComoThe pike is present throughout all the lake waters within the local provinces, and in lake Como and lake Lugano the populations of pike have significantly increased in recent years. This is due to local conservation efforts, and namely the introduction and development of submerged aquatic plant life in large areas of the coastal regions.

The Pike, while being highly prized and protected for sport fishing purposes, is also of major importance for the local wildlife, and its conservation is pursued through periodic re-population. In the local lakes the species enjoys special protection: from 2007 pike fishing in several of the smaller lake basins is “catch and release” only.

+ Chub

The Chub is a member of the Carp family or the Cyprinidae found throughout lakes and rivers across the world. Known to reach lengths of up to 80cms, and weighing up to 9lb, they are a highly sought after fish by many sports fishermen.

Chub are renowned for being very greedy fish, and can be caught on a wide range of baits and techniques. Often mistaken for grass Carp, they are very similar in appearance, however are distinguishable by the orange-red colouring of their fins.

Mainly found along the margins and small bays, they tend to favour overhanging trees and covered areas. Rarely found on their own, Chub are generally sighted in small shoals especially during their juvenile years.

With their greedy and predatory nature, they can be caught using a wide range of techniques, from small spinners as well as free lining natural baits such as Slugs or Crayfish. Float fishing can also work very well in the summer months, along with fly fishing using large dry flies such as Woolly Buggers, Daddy Longlegs or Hoppers. Some of the most popular baits include maggots, corn, bread, along with boilies, lobworms and slugs, or even floating crust.

The chub is present throughout lake Como, lake Lugano, lake Pusiano, and the whole of north Italy. During the breeding season chub can often be found heading up river tributaries in search of waters suitable for spawning. In lake Como and lake Lugano, although still quite widespread, Chub are no longer as abundant as they once were. For this reason regulations have recently been introduced raising the minimum size of catches that can be kept, along with introducing a closed season for fishing, that coincides with the spawning season.

+ Walleye (Zander)

The Zander is closely related to the Perch, however with a stronger resemblance to the Pike with their long elongated body and head, yet with a spiny dorsal fin similiar to the Perch, they are often called Pike-Perch. Zander are not however, as is commonly believed, a pike and perch hybrid.

Zander are an extremely aggressive fish, and like the Pike can grow extremely large, reaching lengths of up to 120cms and weights of 20kgs, they are a choice target for many anglers, with the world record having been achieved in a local lake – Lago di Maggiore as recently as June 2016.

Known to be extremely aggressive, even with documented cases of attacking humans –  In July 2009 in Switzerland, a zander attacked tourists in Lake Maggiore, sending two people to the emergency room; the worst cut inflicted was about 10 centimeters long. However, the 70-cm 8-kg fish was later caught by the local police who cooked it and offered it to the tourists for the trouble it caused.

With a healthy and widespread population in Lake Lugano for many years, the Zander was since introduced into the local waters of Como. Here they have managed to develop very large populations, and more recently have appeared in the lakes of Pusiano and Lake Piano, where there are significant populations numerically and where we have begun to see individuals of considerable size. In Lake Como itself however, Zander have so far settled effectively in two main areas, the area in front of the city of Como and the extreme northern portion of the basin, near the mouths of the rivers Adda and Mera.

The Zander is a species that is of considerable interest for both sports fishermen and professionals alike, and is protected locally by a prohibition period and also a minimum size for kept fish, in Lake Lugano, Lake Pusiano, Lake Alserio and the first basin of Lake Como.

+ Whitefish

The freshwater whitefish are fish of one of three subfamilies in the salmon family – Salmonidae, with ‘cousins’ such as the Salmon, the Trout, Char and the Grayling. Freshwater whitefish are distributed mainly in relatively cool waters throughout the northern parts of the Northern Hemisphere.

The European Whitefish is one of many possible species or classifications of Whitefish, and is still under study to determine parameters between identifying species. Originally the Whitefish was not a native species of northern Italy, however it was introduced for the first time in Italy and the Lake Como region in particular in 1885, from specimens that were captured from Lake Constance in Switzerland.

The Whitefish seldom grow more than 55 cm (22 in) long or exceed 2 kg (4.4 lb) in weight, however they are still a popular fish for both sports fishermen and professionals alike.

In the local waters of Como and the surrounding regions, the Whitefish is only present in the lakes of Como and Lugano, while it is absent in the other smaller lakes. In Lake Lugano the species has undergone a drastic decline in numbers due to the eutrophication phenomena (excessive richness of nutrients in a lake or other body of water, frequently due to run-off from the land, which causes a dense growth of plant life), that have affected the waters of the lake in the past several decades. However, the recent hydro-qualitative improvements of the Lugano lake seems to offer again the conditions for the presence of the species, as shown by the first significant catches made by professional fishermen in recent years.

In Lake Como whitefish were introduced at the end of the 19th century in order to increase the rewards for professional fishing. The whitefish is of such high importance to the local fishing industry, that it is the main reason behind the restructuring and building work under taken on the river Fiumelatte and its incubation systems, which since 2001, have been reactivated with the aim of producing hundreds of thousands of young Whitefish for Lake Como and the fishing industry that surrounds it.

+ Burbot

The Burbot is a freshwater fish in the gadidae family, with cousins such as the cod, it is believed to be the only freshwater member of the family. Known to favour deep waters and specifically lakes, they are often to be found at depths of around 300m (980ft).

Believed to be extinct throughout much of Europe, however the Burbot can still be found in several of the deepest pre-alpine lakes, and has also been reported in some of their tributaries.

With numbers in serious decline throughout much of the EU, studies are still being undertaken as to the possibility of varying species within the Burbot family, but known maximum lengths range between 30 and 120 cm (12 and 47 in), and weight ranges from 1 to 12 kg (2.2 to 26.5 lb).

As the Burbot is such a unique species of deep water fish, preferring deep lake environments, it is believed that they therefore can only be found in Lake Como and Lake Lugano. With an appearance like a cross between a catfish and an eel, the Burbot has a serpent-like body, but is easily distinguished by a single barbel on the chin. The body is elongated and laterally compressed, with a flattened head and single tube-like projection for each nostril. The mouth is wide, with both upper and lower jaws consisting of many small teeth. Burbot have two soft dorsal fins; the first being low and short, and the second being much longer. The anal fin is low and almost as long as the dorsal fin. Having such small fins relative to body size indicates a benthic or bottom dwelling lifestyle with low swimming endurance, unable to withstand strong currents.

+ Eel

The European Eel is a species of the eel family found throughout Europe, with a snake-like appearance and are mainly catadromous fish, heading downstream to the sea in order to spawn.

With average lengths of around 60 to 80cms, but they have been known to grow up to 1.5 metres in length in extreme cases. Captive specimens of the European Eel have lived as long as 80 years, while the species lifespan in the wild is yet to be determined.

The European Eel can be found in almost all of the lakes and rivers throughout northern Italy from Lake Lugano to Lake Como, and all of the smaller lakes. It is known to be widespread in the river Lambro, in the Mera river and in the channels of the river Adda. Its presence in the Como province depends on the re-population carried out annually, performed to ensure the conservation of the species in an area historically colonised and which would otherwise be difficult for the Eel to reach by natural means.

+ Black Bass

The black bass is a type of freshwater fish closely related to the sunfish, and originally found throughout North America and Canada. Several species of the bass family were then introduced throughout the world, notably the large-mouth bass and the small-mouth bass.

Of all the members of the bass family, the black bass are possibly the most highly sought-after of all as a game fish, and bass fishing is a very popular sport worldwide. These fish are well known as extremely strong fighters, with many countries also considering them a delicacy.

The male of most species of the bass family builds a nest by hollowing out a depression using his tail, then proceeds to guard the eggs. With its introduction throughout Europe in 1883, its presence in Italy dates back to early in the 20th century, when it was introduced in two lakes – lake Brianza and lake Sommani. Bass now populate almost all lakes, ponds and rivers throughout northern and central Italy.

In Lake Como, the bass as a species appeared only recently and catches until recent years were quite rare. Although it is an exotic species, the large-mouth bass is protected with minimum sizes of fish that can be kept, and a prohibition period each year, and in some lakes (Pusiano, Segrino and Montorfano) with extremely strict catch limits also in place. The species is now of great importance and interest for sport fishing, with catch and release being the general trend.

ROD RENTAL AND HOTSPOTS

If you are just looking to rent a few rods and go out on your own for a few hours, drop by our office and we will advise you on the best spots according to the season and weather.

Send us an email, give us a call, or just pop round and we can prepare all the equipment for you, advise you on local regulations and licensing laws and point you in the right direction for the local hot-spots, so you can just go out and have a great time!

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€50 deposit is required per rod or waders.

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